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called "martin's dream." internees his own journey with dr. king and the legacy -- one of the grid -- the legacy of one of the greatest men this nation has ever produced. a conversation with clayborne carson coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: on this day, when we honor the memory and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr., i am pleased to be joined by dr. clayborne carson, the director of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the
that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroes. it's a cross-cultural drama. c-span: your credit -- i think it is an outfit called lyndhurst of chattanooga -- and the macarthur of chicago and the ford foundation as places that have given you money over the years; is the right? >> guest: yes. after "parting the waters" came out, because this book has taken nine years. the ford foundation gave me my first and only a research grant that i used to hire somebody for tw
which dr. king could not resist, and lyndon johnson couldn't. they were constantly being pushed from below by people who wanted action. johnson becomes president on november 22, 1963. he is an accidental president. he had been in the backwaters of the vice-presidency. heed been drinking too much. he was fat. he was unhappy. he was cantankerous, and he was a forgotten man. martin luther king, on that day, faced a crisis of his own. the civil rights legislation that john f. kennedy finally introduced in june of '63, pushed by the demonstrations in birmingham, which revealed the police dogs dogs and the fire h. suddenly the government had to act. the first great accomplishment of lynn johnson son, that not much attention is given to, is the magnificent way he assumed the presidency. this was a nation in crisis. we had a cold war going on. in which the -- there was huge fear of russian missiles heading our way. our president had been killed. we didn't know whether it was the russians who had kill him or castro or -- it was great, great uncertainty. and johnson came to that job, reassured
dr. king's with president obama. but earlier, it was that speech. and he defied expectations again. there were specifics on voting, on gay rights, on women's rights, on climate change, on immigration, on gun control. and he defended the big three entitlements. joining me now is democratic senator from ohio, broun. what a speech. how surprised were you at the tone and the specifics in this speech? >> i wasn't surprised. i mean, we had very high expectations for him. he delivered. i loved the line as barney frank and others mentioned from seneca falls to selma to stonewall and i think that says a couple things. it says, one, how we've moved forward as a nation and we should acknowledge that at the inauguration. and, second, it underscores how none of those were easy. you know everything about civil rights and what happens with women's rights and what happens with gay rights. it's always a battle tomorrow that starts. and the president, i like how he is engaged with organizing for action. and i like how he knows that the country is behind him but needs to remind the congress that it's
his legacy live on. i'll have more on dr. king's legacy coming up later in the show. but first, we want to show you -- we want to share your thoughts about dr. king, about his dream on our facebook page. please head over to facebook and search "politicsnation" and like us to join the conversation that's going long after the show ends. if by blessed you mean freaked out about money well we suddenly noticed that everything was getting more expensive so we switched to the bargain detergent but i found myself using three times more than you're supposed to and the clothes still weren't as clean as with tide. so we're back to tide. they're cuter in clean clothes. thanks honey yeah you suck at folding [ laughs ] [ female announcer ] one cap of tide gives you more cleaning power than 6 caps of the bargain brand. [ woman ] that's my tide, what's yours? five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn fro
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealous. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
assessment -- martin luther king, jr. [applause] so the president will clearly be in the foreground, but dr. king looms large as the backdrop. now, word comes from the white house that they will use his bible for this historic and iconic celebration, so we will talk tonight about how we honor the legacy of dr. king by focusing more attention on the issue that he gave his life for -- the poor. king once said we have to civilize ourselves by the immediate abolition of poverty. obviously, we are not quite there yet, but we of tonight's conversation will aid us and of that as in trying to make sure that we look out for the least among us. i am pleased tonight to be joined by an all-star panel. i want to introduce them one by one and jumped right into the conversation. i want to start by thanking c- span for carrying this program live around the world tonight. [applause] thank you, c-span. as the conversation gets under way, we will tell you more about what you can do at home or wherever you might be watching tonight to join in the conversation, but for now, let me introduce the novice panel of
our schools are setting up academies. dart -- dr. martin luther king academy of leadership and enterprise. or they will name them for langston hughes, frederick douglass. -- frederick douglass. i do not think a lot people should let the name the schools. [laughter] [applause] they should name it for people they do not like. [laughter] here are a few points. i will be unfashionable tonight. everyone in washington seems to think the way to solve the problems in our schools is to not give them another cent, another penny, to improve and make the schools look like places that are inviting and respect the value of children. aesthetics count. do not do that, but beat up on their teachers. that is the trend today. [applause] attack the unions. i heard about the teachers union from teachers in l.a. last fall. i flew to chicago to stand with them the day they went on strike. they were right to go on strike. [applause] i will tell you something. i am in schools all the time. when i was a young teacher, i remember this. schools are overwhelmingly -- the teachers are women. you go to a
, bobby kennedy was her -- assassinated two days before i walked across the stage for graduation. dr. king, the one who got week engaged in politics, was assassinated earlier that year. even assassination attempt at a george wallace. it is no wonder things held together quite frankly. well, the congress passed what was then called the gun control act. among other things it said that felons, fugitives, drug users, those who have been adjudicated and it is not a politically correct phrase, but it is in the law, those that are mentally affected could not own a gun. 1994 as a world change in country changed, along with the thing i am proud is for having written and passed about. we added a new category of people who were prohibited from purchasing a gun. based on facts, not on fiction. that is those who had a restraining order issued against them in a domestic violence incident. that was a fight to get that added. then, two years later we expanded the list again to include anyone convicted of a misdemeanor violent crime, that they were the most likely people to do something. time and experienc
:58:48-11:58:57"we're tryyng to be helpful in ballimore and this sort of embodies some of the things dr. king was committed to and we are too." &ptoo."operation: olivee' ii a neighborhood, and tackling them aa the resources become avvilable. 3 33 3 3 3 heeravens make a major &pcoaching decisiin eeks before the super bowl....oo it impacts next year's team... 3and she was gettiig away...... at two miles an hour.the response this woman gave whenn a police officer pulled her over in a scoottr used in -sup. -3 ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmm, tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? the 37 deaa hostages in algerii... //...include... 3... americans... americans... includinn victor lovelady...// he as n
-- the conversation could not be more timely. i sell the time, quoting dr. king, that budgets are moral documents. you can say what you say, but you are what you are. we know who you are when you put your budget on the table. we can see what your budget priorities are. could not be more timely. we are days away -- it will be a big party on monday, but after monday as we move toward the debt ceiling conversations and the spending cuts get placed on the table, the poor are likely to take it on the chin. that is why we are here with in washington tonight having this conversation. our hashtag is #povertymustend. our website is afuturewithoutpoverty.com. you'll find a letter on that website -- you can electronically sign it asking the president to give a major public policy address on poverty sooner than later, and second to convene a white house conference on the eradication of poverty to bring experts to get into crafting national plan to cut poverty in half and eradicate it in the richest nation in the world. it is not a skill problem, it is via upawe have the will to the poverty a priority with in this
the aura of dr. king today quite well. >> pelley: and this day being inauguration day and martin luther king day all at the same time. doug, thanks very much. cbs news live coverage of the inauguration of president obama will continue from washington in just a moment. [ male announcer ] nearly sixteen million people visit washington dc every year. some come to witness... some to be heard. we come to make an impact. to learn from leaders... and to lead others. to create... and create change. we are the george washington university... we come to make history. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. >> pelley: welcome back to cbs news
'll come through the rotunda, walk by that bust of dr. martin luther king, jr., and then into statuary hall for a tradition that's the most exclusive lunch you can imagine. all of the nation's leaders, the president, the vice president, congressional leaders, supreme court justices, their spouses, they will all gather for a lunch to put politics aside for at least a brief moment. >> thank you very much, jan. >>> as we watch the president's motorcade approaching the capitol, let me give you a little bit of an advanced look on what you're seeing as the inauguration ceremonies proceed. as we mentioned, senator charles schumer of new york will be the master of ceremonies. he will have a short speech and then he will be introducing myrlie evers-williams, a former chair of the naacp and the widow of medgar evers. the naacp field secretary who was gunned down in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on t
of recognizes dr. king's birthday and commitment to that agenda. we were at the church service and the agenda i don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on t
, using the lincoln bible and dr. king's traveling bible. he said it was a privilege to be sworn in, using the bible and he actually -- the king family asked him to autograph it. he and chief justice roberts inscribed the bible at the request of the family. >> that's amazing. >> yeah. >> that was a beautiful moment there. and, obviously, great significance to president obama. not just that he was inaugurated for a second term, but doing it on that day meant a lot to him. meant a lot to people in the crowd. we move then into the evening portion. this is where the fashion really gets hot. first lady in red. you just talked to jason wu a couple of minutes ago. also designed the first lady's 2009 inaugural gown. did we like the gown? >> i loved it. red on her is her color. she looks stunning. in anything. she would look great with a paper bag on, frankly, but -- >> he said he was really shocked because, of course, he did the 2009 gown. as a designer, you're thinking she'll probably branch out. what are the chances she picks it again? he did design a dress custom made for her. he is really a sw
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)